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Frequently Asked Questions


Members

If I become a member of CONNECT, can I still license my repertoire directly?

Yes; CONNECT is a non-exclusive licensing agency. This means that you may sign direct agreements with anyone you wish. Any direct agreement you sign will take precedence over your agreement with CONNECT.

Why is CONNECT directing their members to Re:Sound for the assignment of Remunerative Rights?

Re:Sound is the only organisation in Canada that collects neighbouring rights royalties directly from businesses according to its certified tariffs and private copying royalties directly from the Canadian Private Copying Collective for artists and labels (together these rights form your Remunerative Rights). Re:Sound pays the money it collects either to its member organisations on behalf of the rights holders they represent, or to artists and labels directly. Assigning these rights directly to Re:Sound will simplify data processing and result in faster distribution of remunerative rights payments for master rights owners.

What happens if more than one company claims ownership in a sound recording/music video?

If more than one company claims ownership of a sound recording/music video, CONNECT will put the title on hold in our database to ensure that no money is paid out until the conflict is resolved, then contact both parties informing them of the conflict.

It is then up to the parties involved to contact each other and resolve the conflict. CONNECT has no ability to negotiate conflicts on behalf of our members. Once you have resolved the conflict, we require confirmation of the resolution by both parties. We will then update our database to reflect the correct owner, and release any funds associated with the title to the appropriate party.

How do CONNECT licensees obtain copies of my repertoire?

There are three methods by which CONNECT licensees may obtain copies of your repertoire:

  1. Purchase from a legal music retailer
  2. Obtain promotional copies directly from your company
  3. DMDS

What countries does CONNECT have reciprocal agreements with?

CONNECT has reciprocal agreements for remunerative rights, via Re:Sound, with the following countries:

Country: Organization:
Brazil Abramus
Denmark Gramex Denmark
Finland Gramex Finland
Germany GVL
Greece / Cyprus Grammo
Ireland PPI
Italy SCF
Japan RIAJ
Netherlands SENA
Norway Gramo
Poland ZPAV
Spain AGEDI
Sweden IFPI Sverige
Ukraine Ukrainian Music Alliance (UMA)
United Kingdom PPL
United States SoundExchange

ISRC

What is the ISRC?

The ISRC (International Standard Recording Code) is the international identification system for sound recordings and music video recordings. Each ISRC is a unique and permanent identifier for a specific recording which is assigned as its digital fingerprint. ISRCs provide the means to track and identify recordings and are used widely by digital services and retailers. CONNECT acts as the Canadian administrator for ISRC codes on behalf of Music Canada.

Who needs to apply for an ISRC Registrant Code?

The Registrant Code should be assigned to whoever owns the master rights. In some cases that is the individual artist or band, while in others it is the record label. (Check your recording contract if you are signed to a record label and you are unsure).

Can I use a digital distributor like CD Baby or TuneCore to assign ISRCs to my recordings?

Yes, where distributors can assign codes on your behalf, they have been given permission from the ISRC Agency in their country to do so. A Registrant code does not indicate ownership of the sound recording it is assigned to. If at a future date you choose to apply for your own Registrant Code, please be aware that once an ISRC has been assigned to an audio recording or video, it remains with that recording forever and only new recordings can be assigned an ISRC using your unique Registrant Code.

How and when do I embed my ISRCs into my songs and/or videos?

For professional mastering, at the final stage of audio mastering your mastering engineer will embed the ISRCs you have created into the data of your masters.

For digitally distributed formats, the ISRC of each track should be included in the metadata of the song file if possible. Some digital file formats do not easily support metadata such as .WAV files, so it is important to always provide ISRCs when uploading audio or video recordings to digital services or retailers. Most will require that an ISRC be submitted for tracking purposes. The MP3 format allows some rights management information to be included but is not often used. It is possible and recommended to embed ISRCs in the ID3 tags. While it is not part of the international standard, it does allow for the encoding of ISRCs.

There is no official way to embed an ISRC into a video, but your video editor should be able to include the ISRC in the metadata of your video file. As with audio, it is important to keep a detailed record of the ISRCs you assign and to provide a video ISRC to any service, retailer or other organization that requests it from you.

How long does the ISRC new registrant code process take?

The ISRC Registrant code process can take up to two business days to assign. If you have an upcoming release that requires a new registrant code, we recommend you apply as early as possible to avoid delays.

Do I apply for a new ISRC Registrant Code for each new year?

No, each master rights owner is supplied with one ISRC Registrant Code. This is a permanent code for everything released by each master owner. The last 5 digits (the Designation Code) of the ISRC change for each individual track released, and with each new year you change the year of reference, and reset the designation code to 00001.

Do I fill out an application form for every new song or album?

No, you only need to apply once. You should use your Registrant Code to create the individual ISRCs for all of the recordings to which you own the master rights.

Who do I register the ISRCs with once I’ve assigned them?

CONNECT does not require each registrant to provide us with a list of all full codes assigned. The registrant is solely responsible for keeping an up-to-date record of the ISRCs that have been assigned to their recordings, and providing them to any agencies that use them (i.e. iTunes, CD Baby, etc).

How long does the whole process take?

Before you receive your ISRC Registrant code you must answer a few yes or no questions and then fill out the application form. Once completed, an ISRC Registrant Code is generated automatically, and you will receive your code right away. The process takes roughly five minutes.

I made an error in my application. Should I fill out a new one?

No, please do not fill out another application. If you made an error in any part of your application, please email all corrections to [email protected]


DJ Licensing

When is a CONNECT DJ licence not required?

You do not need a CONNECT DJ licence if:

  • You are only using the original purchased store-bought albums (ex. CD, vinyl, etc)
  • You are only using content that you’ve leased from a CONNECT licensed music supply service
  • You belong to a DJ Association and your CONNECT DJ licence is included in your association fees

CONNECT cannot authorize:

  • Synchronization (embedding of sound recordings into visual presentations).
  • Compiling sound recordings on CD-Rs to use as “give-aways” or to sell.
  • Karaoke tracks (please contact the production companies of the karaoke discs for more information on licensing).

I run a dance school and our instructors use personal copies of sound recordings. Do I need a licence?

Yes, if your instructors are using copies of sound recordings as background music for their classes, you will need to obtain a CONNECT Standard “All-in-one” DJ licence for each classroom. Even though a dance school is technically not a “DJ”, the copies and use of the sound recordings is the same (performance to the public).

If I subscribe to a CONNECT licensed Music Supply Service Company, do I need a separate CONNECT DJ licence?

If you are only using the content supplied to you by one of CONNECT’s licensed Music Supply Service companies then you do not require any further licensing. However, if you are also using any copies of sound recordings on a hard drive source or CD-Rs that have been copied from your store bought CD’s/vinyl/etc… OR you have downloaded songs from iTunes in addition to the content you are subscribed to then you will require an additional CONNECT Standard “All-in-one” DJ licence.

What is the difference between CONNECT and SOCAN and Re:Sound?

CONNECT collects on behalf of the master rights owners of sound recordings and collects reproduction royalties. SOCAN collects on behalf of the composers and authors of sound recordings and collects performance royalties. Re:Sound collects on behalf of the master rights owners of sound recordings and collects performance royalties.  By way of example, if you are playing copied sound recordings from your hard drive, you require a CONNECT licence.  The performance royalties collected by SOCAN and Re:Sound are the responsibility of the venues.